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The Beatles: New track featuring all four band members set for release next week | Ents & Arts News

Sir Paul McCartney and Sir Ringo Starr will release what they say is the last song featuring all four Beatles next week.

The track, called Now And Then, was written and performed by John Lennon and later developed alongside the other band members including George Harrison.

The track has now been finished by Sir Paul and Sir Ringo decades after the original recording – using new technology.

A demo was first recorded by Lennon in the late 1970s at his New York home and features piano music.

After his death in 1980 aged 40, Lennon’s wife Yoko Ono gave the recording to the band along with Free As A Bird and Real Love, which were released by the band in the 1990s.

Former Beatles Ringo Starr (L) and Paul McCartney attend the world premiere of 'The Beatles: Eight Days a Week - The Touring Years' in London, Britain September 15, 2016. REUTERS/Neil Hall
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Former Beatles Ringo Starr and Paul McCartney in 2016

During this period, Harrison, Sir Paul and Sir Ringo recorded new parts and completed a rough mix for Now And Then with producer and musician Jeff Lynne.

But the band did not release the song – blaming issues extracting Lennon’s vocals and piano in a clear mix due to limited technology at the time.

Harrison died in November 2001 aged 58.

New audio restoration technology has now allowed for vocals, music and conservations by the band to be isolated.

FILE - The Beatles are seen performing, date unknown. From left to right: Paul McCartney, George Harrison, Ringo Starr, and John Lennon. McCartney has revisited the breakup of The Beatles, refuting the suggestion that he was responsible for the group’s demise. Speaking on an episode of BBC Radio 4’s “This Cultural Life’’ that is scheduled to air Oct 23, McCartney said it was John Lennon who wanted to disband The Beatles. (AP Photo)
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Pic: AP

Lennon’s decades-old demo and Harrison’s electric and acoustic guitar recorded in 1995 were both included on the track, which Sir Paul and Sir Ringo finished last year.

Backing vocals from Here, There And Everywhere, Eleanor Rigby and Because were also added.

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Sir Paul said: “There it was, John’s voice, crystal clear. It’s quite emotional and we all play on it, it’s a genuine Beatles recording.

“In 2023, to still be working on Beatles music, and about to release a new song the public haven’t heard, I think it’s an exciting thing.”

Sir Ringo said: “It was the closest we’ll ever come to having him back in the room so it was very emotional for all of us. It was like John was there, you know. It’s far out.”

Meanwhile, Lennon’s son, Sean Ono Lennon, said the new song was “incredibly touching”.

Read more:
Musicians react to AI songs flooding the internet
Rare photos from Cavern Club found
McCartney’s childhood home opened for unsigned artists

“It’s the last song my dad, Paul, George and Ringo got to make together. It’s like a time capsule and all feels very meant to be,” he added.

Two compilation albums will also be released on 10 November – 1962-1966, The Red Album, and 1967-1970, The Blue Album – featuring 21 newly added tracks.

A documentary about the new song, Now And Then – The Last Beatles Song will premiere at 7.30pm on 1 November on The Beatles’ YouTube channel.

Coins featuring portrait of King Charles unveiled – as Royal Mint reveals when they will enter circulation | UK News

Coins featuring a portrait of King Charles III will gradually enter circulation from December.

The Royal Mint says his image will appear on 50p coins first – and in keeping with tradition, the King’s portrait faces to the left, the opposite direction to the Queen.

A commemorative £5 coin has also been created that features two new portraits of the late monarch on the back.

Read more: Queen’s death certificate reveals how she died

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The commemorative £5 coin

Nicola Howell, chief commercial officer at the Royal Mint, said King Charles worked closely with sculptor Martin Jennings – and personally approved the effigy.

This was “to make sure there was a seamless empathetic way to end her majesty’s reign and to actually signal the new reign of a new king”.

The Latin inscription surrounding the effigy reads: “:: CHARLES III :: D :: G :: REX :: F :: D :: 5 POUNDS :: 2022” which translates to: “King Charles III, by the Grace of God, Defender of the Faith.”

The effigy could be viewed as softer and less regal than those of previous monarchs.

Chris Barker, from the Royal Mint Museum, described the portrait as “dignified and graceful, which reflects his years of service”.

He added: “I think if you look back on some of the portraits of Elizabeth – particularly her first portrait by Mary Gillick – it was much more idealised.

“This one is much more of the man himself, of the individual, you see the lines in his face, the years of experience, and that humanity coming across.”

The reverse of the commemorative £5 coin features two new portraits of Queen Elizabeth II, showing a younger and older image of the late monarch.

The design was created by artist John Bergdahl in collaboration with the Royal Mint.

It will form part of a wider memorial coin collection.

Ms Howell said: “We expect customers will start to be able to receive the commemorative range from October and then we expect the 50p memorial circulating coin to be appearing in people’s change probably from December.”

The reverse of the 50p features a design that originally appeared on the 1953 Coronation Crown.

It was struck to commemorate Queen Elizabeth II’s coronation at Westminster Abbey, and includes the four quarters of the Royal Arms depicted within a shield.

In between each shield is an emblem of the home nations: a rose, a thistle, a shamrock and a leek.

Read more from Sky News:
When will King Charles banknotes be released?
King Charles’s new royal monogram revealed
King Charles in pictures
The events that shaped Britain’s new King

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Timeline: From Queen’s death to funeral

All UK coins bearing the effigy of Queen Elizabeth II will remain legal tender and coins featuring the new King will co-circulate alongside those of his mother.

Historically it has been commonplace for coins featuring the effigies of different monarchs to co-circulate, helping to minimise the environmental impact and cost.

There are around 27 billion coins currently circulating in the UK bearing the effigy of Queen Elizabeth II. They will be replaced over time as they become damaged or worn and to meet demand for additional coins.