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Queen’s death: Royal staff told their jobs could be affected under King Charles | UK News

Staff who provided personal services to the late Queen have been told that some of their jobs could be at risk under King Charles III.

A letter has been sent to a number of employees informing them that consultations will be held.

The letter, from Sir Michael Stevens, keeper of the privy purse, says: “I am sure you can appreciate that these are sensitive and challenging times.”

He adds that work is underway to support staff and ensure there are “good communications” over the coming weeks.

The letter says: “Consistent with continuity, the approach on Accession is essentially that the requirements and the purpose of the Household continue unchanged following demise.

“While it is too early to confirm the position definitively, it is anticipated that only a very small minority of employees (fewer than 20) who provided personal services to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth will see their posts affected by Her Majesty’s death.

“We will be consulting with you and those affected in relation to these anticipated changes after the State Funeral. Those affected are being written to.”

Last week it was disclosed that up to 100 employees at the King’s former official residence, Clarence House, had been notified that they could lose their jobs.

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Mark Serwotka, the general secretary of the Public and Commercial Services Union, which represents a number of employees in the royal households, said staff had worked for the Queen for a number of years and felt “let down” after receiving the letter.

“Our members are disappointed and saddened by this development,” he said.

Meetings are being held with those affected and staff are being told they can contact Employee Assistance providers in the coming weeks.

Buckingham Palace has not commented on the letter.

Record number of jobs being advertised – with actors and dancers in high demand | UK News

A record number of jobs are being advertised, with big increases for actors, entertainers, driving instructors and dancers, according to recruiters.

Vacancies for water and waste roles such as sewerage plant operatives have also increased, which recruiters said could be related to the prolonged dry weather and fears of droughts.

There were 1.85 million job adverts in the last week of July, with up to 200,000 being added every week in the past month, according to the Recruitment and Employment Confederation (REC).

Three out of the UK’s top 10 hiring hotspots were in London in the last week of July.

Kate Shoesmith, deputy chief executive of the REC, said: “This new data shows the continued strength of the jobs market, despite any wider economic uncertainty.

“The number of job adverts being posted each week is stable. It’s a great time to be looking for work as a jobseeker, as employers are having to think more about the pay, benefits, conditions and development opportunities they offer both new starters and current staff as they compete for talent.

“There is a danger that with costs soaring, employers will have to reprioritise – as there is still no viable support package for businesses to meet these rising costs.

“We know that employers’ confidence in the broader economy has started to drop. Government must play its role, both in supporting people and businesses through the current crisis, and also by working with industry to create a sustainable labour market.

“We need a long-term workforce strategy that encompasses skills, immigration and makes childcare and local transport part of the infrastructure of our labour market.”

Vacancies for probation officers, health and social care workers fell in recent weeks, according to the report.