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Newcastle star Joelinton becomes latest footballer to have home targeted by burglars | UK News

Newcastle United’s Joelinton has become the latest footballer to be targeted by burglars.

“Three men” entered his home as he watched his team play Manchester City in the Premier League at St James’ Park on Saturday evening, the Brazilian midfielder told Northumbria Police.

He “immediately” reported his concerns after getting an alert on his phone, the force said.

Officers were sent to the property on Runnymede Road in Darras Hall, northwest of Newcastle, after being called shortly before 7.30pm.

Those “alleged to be involved” had fled, police added.

Shortly before the turn of the year, burglars reportedly made off with £1m worth of jewellery and watches after raiding the home of Man City and England midfielder Jack Grealish.

Thieves targeted his Cheshire mansion as he played for the Premier League champions at Everton’s Goodison Park in Liverpool.

Members of Grealish‘s family and his fiancee, Sasha Atwood, were watching the televised match at the property when they heard a disturbance, The Sun newspaper reported.

Manchester City's Jack Grealish during the English Premier League soccer match between Everton and Manchester City at Goodison Park stadium in Liverpool, England, Wednesday, Dec. 27, 2023. (AP Photo/Jon Super)
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Jack Grealish’s house was burgled in late December. Pic: AP

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Joelinton is currently sidelined with a thigh injury which is expected to keep him out until next month.

A Northumbria Police spokesperson said: “Shortly before 7.30pm yesterday (Saturday) police received a call from a concerned homeowner who reported that three men were inside their home on Runnymede Road in Darras Hall.

“Thankfully the homeowner was not home but had received a security alert on their phone and immediately reported concerns to police.

“Police were deployed to the scene. However, those alleged to be involved had fled.

“Enquiries remain ongoing.”

Coronation protesters ‘targeted’ by police to ‘stop message getting out’ | UK News

The arrest of protesters during the coronation has been branded a “direct attack on democracy” that shows the right to peacefully demonstrate “no longer exists”, the leader of an anti-monarchy group has said.

After 52 people were detained for conspiracy to cause a public nuisance and other public order offences, Republic’s Graham Smith said “every police officer involved on the ground should hang their heads in shame”.

Among the group’s members who felt “targeted” and silenced were nine people that held up signs reading “Not my King” at the Mall, moments before the procession left Buckingham Palace.

Although not arrested, they were whisked out of sight of the King and Queen into St James’s Park to be searched by Welsh police officers, outnumbering them roughly two-to-one.

Republic protesters at the Mall during the King's Coronation. May 6, 2023

Officers surrounded them and exchanged words before rifling through their pockets – some protesters faced the wall with their hands up in front of them.

Protester Harvey Woolf said: “I wasn’t very happy about the searches, I think we had been targeted because they didn’t want our message to get out.”

He continued: “What we are annoyed and disappointed about is that it was timed exactly to coincide with the point at which the carriage went down the Mall.”

Follow live coverage of the coronation

The 66-year-old said police told him the protesters were suspected of carrying paint, but an officer told Sky News they led the Republic members away to avoid a “hostile environment” created by the crowds.

Harvey Woolf, 66, Republic protestor, at the Mall during the coronation of King Charles
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Harvey Woolf

Royal supporters had booed and shouted “shame on you” when the protesters were initially marched away from the Mall.

The Met and Welsh police were asked if it was policy to remove people who are subject to a “hostile environment”, rather than those creating it, but were not able to immediately respond to a request for comment.

The protesters had been standing still holding bright yellow signs above their heads, several rows back from the barricades lining the Mall, to object to what they called hereditary privilege and power.

Ronda Evans, 69, Republic protester, is searched by police during the King's Coronation. May 6, 2023
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Ronda Evans

One of them, Ronda Evans, 69, said: “The monarchists turned on us and started booing and growling at us when they saw us surrounded by the police officers.”

More from the King’s coronation:
William receives gift as Prince and Princess of Wales meet royal fans
London mayor calls for ‘urgent clarity’ from Met over policing of coronation protests
Moments that mirrored Queen Elizabeth II’s coronation

Republic were not the only group at the centre of a dispute over police behaviour yesterday, with Westminster Council volunteers handing out rape alarms reportedly arrested.

The arrests come in the wake of the Public Order Act, given royal assent on Tuesday, which handed the police more powers to curtail demonstrations, such as allowing officers to search people for items including locks and glue.

Forensic psychologist tells of ‘terrifying’ stalking ordeal – and reveals why some celebrities are targeted | UK News

When Kerry Daynes discovered the words “Jill Dando” scrawled on her fence, shortly after her cat was found dead in her garden with its neck apparently broken, she believed her life was in danger.

The forensic psychologist has come face-to-face with some of the UK’s most notorious criminals, including Moors murderer Ian Brady and violent inmate Charles Bronson, through her work in maximum security prisons.

But it was after her appearances on television that she says made her the target of a stalker.

After taking part in several crime documentaries, Daynes was contacted online by a stranger offering her the chance to buy domains for websites set up in her name.

She declined the offer but he “immediately turned” and responded with “anger and vitriol”, she says.

He “bombarded” her with messages and comments were posted online accusing her of being a liar and remarking on her appearance in different outfits, she says.

“I knew he had my address, he knew what clothes I was wearing, he knew I lived alone,” Daynes tells Sky News.

“It was a really terrifying time.

“I didn’t have any knowledge of him. I didn’t know who he was.

“He could have been any man who walked past my house or who was behind me in a queue in Tesco’s.

“Every time a man looked at me, I thought: ‘Is that him?’

“I was rushing into my house at night, trying to get my key in the door quickly… and then living with the curtains closed.”

Forensic psychologist Kerry Daynes was a victim of stalking
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Kerry Daynes would lie awake at night fearing for her life

‘Fixated, unwanted, persistent’

Daynes, from Greater Manchester, says she would lie awake at night thinking was this “somebody who was likely to kill me”.

“What was disconcerting about it was the level of obsession this man had about me,” she adds.

“I’d never spoken to him. As far as I was aware, I’d never set eyes on him.

“Fixated, unwanted, persistent – he was clearly a stalker.”

Daynes says the man’s behaviour meant she stopped appearing on TV or at public speaking events and stayed off social media.

She finally came face-to-face with him in a civil court case, which resulted in the websites in her name being taken down.

But years later, while out walking her dog, she says a parked car suddenly sped up and nearly hit her.

A week later, she received a letter from the man with a demand for more than £26,000. Shortly after that, her cat was found dead.

Jill Dando was shot dead on her doorstep in 1999 - the murder remains unsolved
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The name ‘Jill Dando’ was scrawled on Daynes’s fence. Dando was shot dead on her doorstep in 1999

‘Death threat’

“My cat – who had been absolutely fine 10 minutes previously – I found dead, seemingly having had its neck broken, and looking like he’d been thrown over my fence,” Daynes says.

“When I went round to the other side of the fence, somebody had written the words: ‘Jill Dando’.”

Daynes believes the mention of Dando – the TV presenter who was shot dead outside her London home in 1999, in a murder that remains unsolved – was meant as “a death threat”.

“I walked into the police station and said I want to speak to your specialist officer in stalking,” she says.

Daynes says the man later received a harassment warning from police.

The celebrities targeted by stalkers

Emma Raducanu, Claire Foy and David Beckham
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Emma Raducanu, Claire Foy and David Beckham have been victims of stalking

On Friday, a stalker will be sentenced for targeting the actress Claire Foy, who played Queen Elizabeth II in Netflix series The Crown.

Foy described the actions of Jason Penrose as “deeply frightening” after he sent more than 1,000 emails in just over a month, knocked on the door of her home and contacted her sister.

It follows a string of high-profile victims of stalking in recent months.

David Beckham said he was “frightened” for his family’s safety after Sharon Bell sent him “threatening” letters and turned up at his daughter’s school.

She was charged with stalking and detained under the Mental Health Act in July last year.

And in February 2022, a stalker who trekked 23 miles to the home of tennis star Emma Raducanu and stole her father’s shoe as a souvenir was handed a five-year restraining order.

Emma Raducanu

The Suzy Lamplugh Trust, which supports victims of stalking, says cases involving celebrities are “by no means the majority”.

About 45% of people who contact the charity’s helpline are being stalked by ex-partners, and a further third have had prior contact with their stalker.

Read more:
Singer Billie Eilish asks for restraining order

Stalker terrorised 121 victims after making ‘rape list’

Official figures show there were more than 718,000 stalking and harassment offences in England and Wales in the year to June 2022 – a 45% rise compared with the year ending March 2020.

However only 5% of stalking cases in England and Wales result in a charge, according to the National Stalking Consortium.

In November, anti-stalking campaigners submitted a super-complaint – which is designed to consider complaints about systemic issues in policing – after arguing that forces are failing to launch effective probes into stalking crimes.

The five ‘types’ of stalker

There are generally five stalker types, according to forensic psychologist Kerry Daynes.

However the behaviour of stalkers is complex and shifts, meaning they won’t necessarily behave within the confines of one “type”, she adds.

1) The rejected stalker – this is the most common and involves someone attempting to reconcile with a former partner or exacting revenge for perceived rejection. Rejected stalkers can become violent when stalking does not produce their desired outcome.

2) The incompetent suitor – this refers to stalkers who target strangers or acquaintances with the aim of sexual encounters. Action Against Stalking says some people think the term “incompetent suitor” minimises criminal behaviour that is often born out of an attitude of entitlement.

3) The erotomanic or intimacy-seeking stalker – this is fuelled by stalkers’ delusional beliefs that they are already in an intense relationship with the victim. It often involves targeting celebrities or public figures.

4) The resentful stalker – this is motivated by anger where the stalker is convinced they have been mistreated or humiliated by someone, even having had little contact with them. The stalking is vindictive and designed to cause distress or damage to the victim’s reputation.

5) The predatory stalker – this is where stalking is part of a violent or sexual offence pattern. It can involve targeting strangers, with stalkers following victims, watching them and collecting information on them.

Why are celebrities targeted?

Daynes says the most common type of stalker is “the rejected stalker” and most people will know those targeting them.

“Stalking is a pretty gendered crime – more often than not, it is men who stalk their female ex-partners, although that’s not to say you don’t have female stalkers,” she says.

“What we find is that those who stalk people in the public eye, they tend to have low-level mental health problems, they tend to be unemployed, or under-employed, and they’re struggling with various difficulties in their lives.

“I think it’s easy for them to become obsessed with someone they don’t know, because they turn to fantasy to deal with that.

“For people who are inclined to fantasise a relationship with somebody they’ve never met, the fact they’re able to view lots of photographs of them on Instagram or they’re able to look into their home on TikTok videos, it all adds to that faux intimacy.”

Ex-newsreader tells of ‘psychological rape’

Stalking survivor Alexis Bowater was targeted while working as an ITV newsreader. PIc: ITV Westcountry/Home Office
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Alexis Bowater was stalked while working as a newsreader. PIc: ITV Westcountry/Home Office

Former newsreader Alexis Bowater, who was the victim of stalking, described the crime as “psychological rape”.

She was working as a presenter on ITV Westcountry when she was bombarded with emails from stalker Alexander Reeve, who made threats against her and her then-unborn child and falsely claimed a bomb had been placed in the studios.

“It’s barbaric, isn’t it, for a human being to want to torture a pregnant woman,” Bowater tells Sky News.

“I had a Home Office-approved alarm installed in my home and we were linked up to the local police station.

“It was a race against time at that point between them getting him and him getting us.”

Stalking survivor Alexis Bowater was awarded an OBE for her campaign work
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Bowater was awarded an OBE for her campaign work

Reeves was jailed in 2009 for four years but Bowater, who received an OBE for her work to combat violence against women and girls, believes stalking is still “not taken seriously”.

“The sentences are not long enough and not enough people are prosecuted for it,” she says.

“This is a horrific psychological crime which destroys lives.

“When I first start campaigning 10 years ago, people were still making jokes about stalkers. Thank heavens that’s not happening now.”

The private investigator hunting stalkers

Laura Lyons set up a private investigation agency after she was the victim of stalking herself.

Her company – Are They Safe – helps victims of online stalking identify the perpetrators and receives “at least 30 calls” every week about this form of crime.

“It’s a huge, huge problem,” Ms Lyons tells Sky News.

“The landscape of stalking has changed significantly since online communications.

“A lot of the time, until (the stalker) is outside their house, victims don’t know who the stalker is online.

“Sadly, online provides stalkers with the weaponry to stalk anonymously who they want, when they want.

“We’re seeing now that 99% of stalking cases start online.”

Read more:
Stalkers ‘have become increasingly obsessive’
The ‘powerful tool’ to protect stalking victims

Social media makes it ‘easy’ for stalkers to hide

Ms Lyons says she works with “a lot of people in the public eye” who are victims of stalking.

“They have to have active social media,” she adds. “You would be hard-pushed to find a presenter with a closed social profile.”

Ms Lyons says stalkers are using virtual private networks (VPNs) to prevent authorities finding them; sending spyware to victims’ emails; hacking into CCTV cameras and using Apple Air Tags to track victims.

She adds that it is also “easy” for stalkers to set up fake profiles on social media sites and hide their information.

“There are so many tools for stalkers to use,” she says.

“It’s so easy for stalkers to remain anonymous and hidden. It’s very difficult for the police.”