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Major incident declared as Bristol tower block residents told to leave homes ‘immediately’ due to ‘risk to structure’ | UK News

A major incident has been declared in Bristol as residents in a tower block have been told to leave their homes “immediately” due to a “risk to the structure”.

The city council has asked all tenants at Barton House, in the Redfield area, to leave “as a precautionary measure” while more in-depth inspections are carried out.

About 400 people reportedly live in the building.

Surveys at three of the 98 flats found there is a “risk to the structure of the block” in the event of a fire, explosion or large impact.

Anyone who can stay with relatives or friends is being urged to do so, while the remainder will be housed in a temporary rest centre at the Tawfiq Masjid and Centre mosque where beds, food and drink will be available.

More rest centres are “in the process” of being set up, but it is not known how long residents will have to be away from their homes.

A council statement said: “The length of this temporary arrangement is dependent on a further survey of the building, which is being arranged to happen as soon as possible.

“All tenants will be kept regularly informed of progress and any updates on support arrangements.”

The council also said there is “no evidence” to “suggest there is any immediate risk to health and life”.

The statement added that Barton House is the oldest of the tower blocks in the council housing estate, with building work completed in 1958.

“The design and age of Barton House make it unique within the council’s housing estate. There is currently no evidence to suggest the issues identified within Barton House are present elsewhere, although the council is regularly surveying its estate as it works to meet all regulatory requirements,” it said.

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Jersey tower explosion: Search and rescue operation ends with a dozen people still missing | UK News

Rescuers searching for survivors of an explosion at a tower block in Jersey no longer expect to find anyone alive.

Robin Smith, chief of police, said: “It is with sadness that I am confirming that the search and rescue operation had been moved to a recovery operation.

Three people are confirmed to have died in the explosion on Saturday morning and around a dozen are still missing.

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‘Scene of utter tragedy’ at Jersey blast site

Firefighters, specialist rescue teams and dogs worked through the night to find survivors in the debris of the block in St Helier.

The extent of the devastation was evident in video footage posted to Twitter by the Jersey government, which showed piles of rubble, crushed cars and a blown-out window in a neighbouring building.

Police described the scene at Haut du Mont on Pier Road as one of “utter devastation”.

Mr Smith said that the tower block had “completely collapsed” and “doesn’t even look like a building” after the “very, very significant explosion”.

At least three people have died in an explosion at a three-storey tower block in Jersey. Pic: Government of Jersey
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A sniffer dog on the scene. Pic: Government of Jersey
At least three people have died in an explosion at a three-storey tower block in Jersey. Pic: Government of Jersey
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Pic: Government of Jersey

‘Too early to speculate’ about cause

The fire service was called to the building at around 8.30pm on Friday night, hours before the blast, after residents reported smelling gas.

When asked what could cause such a “ferocious” explosion, Paul Brown, the chief fire officer, said there were “many different potential causes”, but it was too early to speculate.

CCTV of the blast
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CCTV of the blast

Residents who lived in the flats have been moved to St Helier Town Hall, where they continue to be supported.

Dominic Raab, the deputy prime minister, tweeted that he was “deeply saddened” by the incident and commended the work of the emergency services response, adding: “We stand ready to support in any way we can.”

Crown secretly removed from Tower of London – for re-sizing ahead of King’s coronation | UK News

A crown kept in the Jewel House of the Tower of London has been removed – but the Beefeaters can rest easy, it has been taken to be re-sized ahead of King Charles’s coronation.

Buckingham Palace said the St Edward’s Crown, the centrepiece of the Crown Jewels viewed by millions of people every year at the Tower, has been moved to an undisclosed location for modification in preparation for the coronation of King Charles III on 6 May next year.

The movement of the priceless crown was kept secret until it was safely delivered.

Versions of the St Edward’s Crown are thought to have been used at the moment of coronation for British and English monarchs since the 13th century.

King Charles III speaks with guests during a reception and ceremony commemorating the 50th anniversary of the Resettlement of British Asians from Uganda in the UK,

The current crown was made for Charles II in 1661, as a replacement for the medieval crown, which had been melted down in 1649.

The original was thought to date back to the 11th-century royal saint, Edward the Confessor, the last Anglo-Saxon king of England.

Embargoed to 2200 Saturday December 3, 2022 GMT File photo dated 2/6/1953 of Queen Elizabeth II wearing the Imperial State Crown as she smiles to the crowd from her carriage as she left Westminster Abbey, London after her coronation. The iconic St Edward's Crown has been removed from the Tower of London to be resized for the King ahead of the Coronation. Issue date: Saturday December 3, 2022.
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Queen Elizabeth wearing the Imperial State Crown as she smiles to the crowd from her carriage after her coronation

It is St Edward’s Crown that appears in the royal coat of arms of the United Kingdom, the Royal Mail logo and in badges of the Armed Forces.

The coronation will take place in Westminster Abbey, eight months after the monarch’s accession and the death of the Queen.

Read more:
What will King Charles’s coronation involve – and will there be a bank holiday?
Why will Camilla be crowned – and what may happen during ‘simpler ceremony’?

Embargoed to 2200 Saturday December 3, 2022 GMT File photo dated 02/06/53 of Queen Elizabeth II wearing the St. Edward Crown and carrying the Sceptre and the Rod after her coronation in Westminster Abbey, London. The iconic St Edward's Crown has been removed from the Tower of London to be resized for the King ahead of the Coronation. Issue date: Saturday December 3, 2022.

It is understood the ceremony will include the same core elements of the traditional service – which has retained a similar structure for more than 1,000 years – while also recognising the spirit of modern times.

Charles’s coronation is expected to be on a smaller scale and shorter, with suggestions it could last just one hour.

It is also expected to be more inclusive of multi-faith Britain than past coronations but will be an Anglican service, with the Queen Consort, Camilla, crowned alongside Charles.

Britain's King Charles and Queen Camilla pose for a picture at the Victoria and Albert Museum (V&A) in London, Britain November 3, 2022. REUTERS/John Sibley

Guest numbers will be reduced from 8,000 to around 2,000, with peers expected to wear suits and dresses instead of ceremonial robes, and a number of rituals, such as the presentation of gold ingots, axed.

The late Queen’s coronation was a carnival of celebration, with half a million spectators lining her procession route on 2 June 1953.

Despite initial reservations, the late Queen eventually agreed to the TV cameras being present in Westminster Abbey to capture the historic event, with licence holders doubling in anticipation.

An estimated 27 million people in Britain alone watched the coronation live on their black and white televisions, and the images were beamed around the world.