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Tory leadership race: Rishi Sunak wins over audience in Sky News’ Battle for Number 10 programme | Politics News

Rishi Sunak was deemed to have won Sky News’ Battle for Number 10 after the majority of audience members voted for him over rival Liz Truss.

Ms Truss and Mr Sunak faced tough challenges from Conservative members who are mostly undecided, followed by questions from Sky News’ Kay Burley.

After the pair put forward their arguments for why they should replace Boris Johnson as leader of the Tory party, and therefore prime minister, the audience members were asked who they thought had won the argument.

The audience, made up of Conservative Party members, convincingly backed Mr Sunak in a show of hands, rather than Ms Truss – who has been winning polls since the battle was whittled down to two.

Live updates: Truss says recession ‘not inevitable’; Sunak told he ‘knifed’ Johnson

Read more: Truss refuses request to apologise over public sector pay policy U-turn

Ms Truss put herself forward as the candidate of integrity, repeatedly saying she will always listen to people and will do something different if a policy is not working.

She said a recession is “not inevitable”, hours after interest rates were hiked, and promised “bold” action compared with Mr Sunak’s caution.

However, former chancellor Mr Sunak said Ms Truss’ vision “will make the situation worse” as he reminded audience members of his financial actions to help people during the COVID pandemic.

He stressed a need to get a grip on runaway inflation before cutting taxes, adding: “But it all starts with not making the situation worse.

“Because if we just put fuel on the fire of this inflation spiral, all of us, all of you, are just going to end up with higher mortgage rates, savings and pensions that are eaten away, and misery for millions.”

Archie Battersbee set to have treatment withdrawn on Monday after life support battle | UK News

Archie Battersbee, who is on life support, is set to have treatment withdrawn at 2pm on Monday unless the government complies with an injunction from the United Nations’ High Commissioner for Human Rights.

Barts Health NHS Trust, which is treating the 12-year-old, said in a letter to his parents that “no supplemental oxygen will be given” after the endotracheal tube of the mechanical ventilator is removed.

Archie has relied on the machine to breathe since being admitted to hospital on 7 April after being found unconscious at home by his mother.

“The time it takes for the heart to stop beating is often a matter of minutes, but in some cases, this can take longer,” the letter continued.

“A doctor will assess Archie regularly to confirm that the heart has stopped beating but with consideration of the family’s need not to have too much intrusion at such a difficult time.”

Archie’s parents Hollie Dance and Paul Battersbee will be told on Monday morning how the withdrawal process is to be performed, with the aim to “preserve Archie’s dignity”, the letter read.

It went on: “You or any of the family may wish to lie on Archie’s bed with him or have him in your arms, if that should be practically possible.”

More on Archie Battersbee

A High Court judge had ruled that ending treatment is in Archie’s best interests, after reviewing evidence from clinicians and said the boy’s prognosis was “bleak”.

The family says doctors should give Archie a chance to recover and have made an application to the UN Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, citing Articles 10 and 12 of the Convention (UNCRPD) which call on nations to ensure the right to life and equal rights for disabled people.

In a letter to Ms Dance and her barrister Mr Bruno Quintavalle, the committee writes it has “requested the state party [the UK] to refrain from withdrawing life-preserving medical treatment, including medical ventilation and artificial nutrition and hydration from the alleged victim while the case is under consideration by the committee”.

Read more:
Archie Battersbee’s mother appeals for help from health secretary
Supreme Court refuses to intervene in life-support battle for brain-damaged boy

Archie's parents Paul Battersbee and Hollie Dance
Image:
Archie’s parents Paul Battersbee and Hollie Dance

On Saturday the government told Sky News it has received correspondence from the UN which it is carefully considering.

A Department of Health and Social Care spokesperson said: “We recognise this is an exceptionally difficult time for Archie Battersbee’s family and our thoughts are with them.

“We have received the letter and will respond in due course.”

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Archie’s mother makes plea

Ms Dance told Sky News she is waiting anxiously for the British government to comply with the UN request.

Barts Health NHS Trust said delaying the start of palliative care would “not be appropriate without an order of the court.”

The family said the assertions were misleading, adding: “We as a family are very disappointed that the Trust’s management has chosen to hide behind euphemisms and to mislead the public.

“It is hard to see any reason for that behaviour except knowing that what they are doing is cruel and wrong.”

Archie Battersbee: Supreme Court refuses to intervene in life-support battle for brain-damaged boy | UK News

The parents of brain-damaged 12-year-old Archie Battersbee have failed to persuade the Supreme Court to intervene in his life-support treatment battle.

The boy’s mother and father, Hollie Dance and Paul Battersbee, had asked Supreme Court justices to give them more time to carry on their fight, possibly taking it to the UN.

But the judges’ decision means the hospital trust can now legally withdraw his medical treatment at any time.

The family’s lawyer has told Sky News Archie’s parents still plan to try to take the case to the UN or the European courts.

It comes after the Court of Appeal earlier this week upheld the High Court’s decision to withdraw life-support treatment for the boy.

The Supreme Court said it “has great sympathy with the plight of Archie’s devoted parents and recognises the emotional pain which they are suffering” but after careful consideration has refused to give them permission to appeal the Court of Appeal’s decision.

Mr Battersbee and Ms Dance want the UN to consider Archie’s case, arguing it has a protocol that allows “individuals and families” to make complaints about violations of disabled people’s rights.

More on Archie Battersbee

They claim the UN could ask the UK government to delay the withdrawal of life support while a complaint is investigated.

Archie's parents Paul Battersbee and Hollie Dance
Image:
Archie’s parents Paul Battersbee and Hollie Dance

Archie has relied on mechanical ventilation since being admitted to hospital on 7 April, after being found unconscious with a ligature around his neck at home in Southend, Essex.

Doctors treating him at the Royal London Hospital in Whitechapel, east London, say he is brain-stem dead and continued life-support treatment is not in his best interests.

Barts Health NHS Trust wants to withdraw treatment and was last week granted permission to do what the High Court ruled was best for Archie.

Undated handout photo of 12-year-old Archie Battersbee. A High Court judge is preparing to make decisions about the future of the 12-year-old boy who has not regained consciousness after suffering brain damage in an incident at home more than a month ago.
Image:
Archie was a keen gymnast

The court ruled in favour of removing life support in June after a test showed he was dead.

On Monday, Court of Appeal judges said doctors could lawfully stop providing the treatment and the youngster could be disconnected from a ventilator.

The family argue that stopping treatment would be in breach of the UK’s obligations under Articles 10 and 12 of the UN Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities, and Article 6 of the UN Convention on the Rights of Children.

IMAGE TAKEN FROM GOFUNDME
12-year-old Archie Battersbee. A High Court judge is preparing to make decisions about the future of the 12-year-old boy who has not regained consciousness after suffering brain damage in an incident at home more than a month ago
Image:
Archie suffered severe brain damage

These international obligations say states must take all necessary measures to ensure disabled people enjoy equal rights and that governments should do all they can to prevent the deaths of children and young people.

Firefighters’ plea for public to help as they battle more ‘weather-related’ blazes in London and Surrey | UK News

Firefighters have urged people to stop using barbecues and remove rubbish in open areas to help prevent fires in hot weather – as yet more blazes have broken out.

At least eight hectares of land were affected by a fire declared a major incident on Sunday, at Hankley Common, near Farnham in Surrey, which has previously been used to film part of the James Bond blockbuster Skyfall.

Crews are expected to remain at the scene through Monday.

And fire crews in London had also been battling wildfires – with blazes in Rammey Marsh in Enfield, Cranford Park in Hayes and Thamesmead, all described as “weather related”.

Read more:
Mum-of-three has nearly nothing left after fire destroys home on UK’s hottest day
Eyewitness: UK heatwave: Families left counting cost of ‘devastating’ house fires in Wennington

Appealing to the public for help, London Fire Brigade urged people to cancel all planned barbecues, remove rubbish, especially glass, from grassland and dispose of cigarettes properly.

The service tweeted: “Please help us prevent further fires by cancelling all planned BBQs, removing rubbish especially glass from grassland & disposing cigarettes correctly. Our firefighters & control officers are doing a fantastic job in challenging conditions. Your co-operation will help us greatly.”

Surrey Fire Service joined the call. It said: “Speak to young relatives about safety outdoors, pack a picnic instead of a BBQ, dispose of cigarettes and litter correctly.”

Temperatures across the southeast of England reached 29C (84F) on Sunday, according to the Met Office.

The fire at Rammey Marsh was the size of four football pitches. Pic: LFB
Image:
A fire at Rammey Marsh was the size of four football pitches. Pic: London Fire Brigade

Images of blackened ground were tweeted by the fire service after the Enfield grass fire at Rammey Marsh over an area of 20 hectares was brought under control.

Some 70 firefighters were sent to the grass fire in Cranford Park, Hayes, where around five hectares of grass and shrubland were alight and smoke spread across west London.

Big Jet TV, which live commentates on planes landing at Heathrow, said visibility was reduced at the airport, sharing a picture of a smoke covered runway from the nearby fire.

Meanwhile, in Thamesmead around 65 firefighters and the fire boat dealt with a grass fire on Defence Close.

The UK has been experiencing a heatwave with a record-breaking high of 40.3C, in Coningsby, Lincolnshire, on Tuesday.

Why a 40C day in the UK is deadlier than a 40C day in other countries

That day the fire service saw its busiest day since the Second World War as a result of the extreme temperatures with crews attending 1,146 incidents on that day alone.

London and Surrey fires: Firefighters battle large blazes around the capital with one declared a ‘major incident’ | UK News

The fire service in Surrey has declared a major incident as crews battle an open fire – as crews in the capital fight three other large blazes, with people in west London told to keep their doors and windows shut.

In Surrey, a fire at Hankley Common near Farnham has drawn “several fire engines” to the area.

The fire service tweeted: “There is a great deal of smoke so please avoid the area, windows and doors should be closed if nearby and pets kept indoors.”

Read more: Dramatic satellite pictures show the impact of the heatwave as high temperatures hit country

Pictures online show plumes of smoke rising over the county, with people as far away as Guildford reporting they can see it.

The fire service later tweeted to ask those nearby to stop calling 999 to report smoke clouds, after receiving “an incredibly high” number of calls.

It added some local roads have been closed as a result of the incident.

Fire crews in London are also battling wildfires – with blazes in Rammey Marsh in Enfield, and Cranford Park in Hayes.

In Enfield, close to Epping Forest, London Fire Brigade (LFB) said around 100 firefighters were battling the grass fire, which had grown to the size of four football pitches.

The service urged people to help prevent further fires by not having barbeques and disposing of cigarettes correctly.

A fire in Hayes can be seen from across west London, with the LFB adding 70 firefighters are at the scene. It says people in the area should close doors and windows.

Big Jet TV, which live commentates on planes landing at Heathrow, says that visibility is reducing at the airport, sharing a picture of a smoke covered runway from the nearby fire at Hayes.

In east London near Newham, another fire is being dealt with in Thamesmead. LFB say 65 firefighters and a fire boat are at the scene close to London City Airport, with those nearby asked to keep doors and windows closed.

It comes after a swathe of wildfires in London and the surrounding area after last week’s record temperatures left the ground tinder-box dry.

The UK hit record temperatures on Tuesday, with Coningsby in Lincolnshire reaching a sweltering 40.3C (104.5F) – the first time since records began that the mercury has exceeded 40C in the country.

Some parts of the UK saw significant damage as a result of the extreme heat, such as house and wildfires, melting airport runways and expanding railway tracks.

Last surviving Battle of Britain pilot, 103, reunited with WWII fighter plane | World News

The last known surviving Battle of Britain fighter pilot has been reunited with a Hurricane aircraft, the type he flew during the war.

Group Captain (retired) John ‘Paddy’ Hemmingway, who turned 103 this week, was the guest of honour at the Irish Air Corps’ centenary year Veterans Day at Casement Aerodrome in Co Dublin on Friday.

As part of the ceremony, the RAF Battle of Britain Memorial Flight, comprising an Avro Lancaster bomber and a Hawker Hurricane, flew in formation over Dublin before landing at the aerodrome.

Group Captain Hemmingway was brought to the vintage fighter in a wheelchair, and its engines were powered up, so he could once again experience the sight and sound of his WWII “office”.

Battle of Britain Memorial Flight being escorted over by the 'The Silver Swallows'
Battle of Britain Memorial Flight being escorted over Dublin by the 'The Silver Swallows'.
Image:
Battle of Britain Memorial Flight being escorted over Dublin by the ‘The Silver Swallows’.

The RAF’s Air Marshal Sir Rich Knighton said: “Group Captain Paddy Hemingway, the last of The Few, is a true inspiration and his accomplishments are as relevant today as they were more than 80 years ago.

“As a fighter pilot during the Battle of Britain, he defended the skies over the UK daily, much as our Typhoon pilots do today. He fought bravely to uphold our values and way of life in the face of tyranny, laying the foundation for the way we deliver collective Air Defence through NATO to deter those who would do us harm.

“Paddy deserves our deep gratitude for all he did to preserve the freedoms we now enjoy.”

Born in Dublin in 1919, John Hemmingway joined the RAF in 1938 and, following the outbreak of the Second World War, was assigned to 85 Squadron in France.

He was credited with destroying a Heinkel He 111 bomber and a Dornier Do 17.

During the Battle of Dunkirk, he flew supporting missions over the Channel, before flying Hurricanes in daily sorties during the Battle of Britain throughout the summer of 1940.

In August 1940, he was forced to bail out over the Thames Estuary when his plane was damaged. He was shot down again over Eastchurch in Kent just a week later.

Squadron Leader Mark Sugden (Hurricane Pilot) speaking with Group Captain John 'Paddy' Hemingway shortly after landing
Image:
Squadron Leader Mark Sugden speaks with Group Captain Hemingway after landing

‘Today we are both proud Irishmen’

On 1 July 1941 Hemmingway was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross (DFC).

He went on to be part of the planning for D-Day before flying Spitfires in Italy.

The veteran airman celebrated his 103rd birthday last Sunday, and lives in a Dublin nursing home.

“Today we are both proud Irishmen”, said General Officer Commanding of the Irish Air Corps Brigadier General Rory O’Connor.

“Seeing the iconic and historic Lancaster and Hurricane flying in Irish skies was very special.

“The arrival of the aircraft serves as a reminder that the Irish Air Corps flew Hurricanes during the Emergency [as WWII was officially known in Ireland].

“I was honoured to host Group Captain Hemingway and be there when he was reunited with his World War II aircraft type.”

(L-R) Air Marshal Sean Reynolds,  Group Captain John 'Paddy' Hemingway, Lieutenant General Seán Clancy, Brigadier General Rory O'Connor, Air Marshal Sir Rich Knighton
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(L-R) Air Marshal Sean Reynolds, Group Captain John ‘Paddy’ Hemingway, Lieutenant General Seán Clancy, Brigadier General Rory O’Connor, Air Marshal Sir Rich Knighton

It was the first visit to Ireland by the RAF Battle of Britain Memorial Flight.

The aircraft will take part in the Bray Air Display in Co Wicklow over the weekend.